Crime Briefs

OVPD respond to threats at Canyon Del Oro

A Canyon Del Oro High School student was arrested after the Oro Valley Police Department responded to possible threats at the facility at 12:49 p.m. Aug. 26. 

When officers arrived, they found no immediate threat to students or staff, nor was a firearm or weapon discovered on school grounds. The investigation is ongoing. 

 

Man convicted of child sexual abuse

A federal jury recently found Eric David Marrufo, 43, of Tucson guilty of five counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child and one count of abusive sexual contact with a child. 

Marrufo is being held in custody pending his Oct. 24 sentencing before U.S. District Judge Cindy K. Jorgenson.

The evidence at trial showed that, between Aug. 1, 2006, and Aug. 1, 2008, Marrufo sexually abused the victims at his home in Tucson, on the Pascua Yaqui Indian Reservation. Marrufo is a member of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe.

Each conviction for aggravated sexual abuse of a child and abusive sexual contact with a child carries a maximum penalty of life in prison, a $250,000 fine, or both.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Pascua Yaqui Police Department conducted the investigation in this case. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Matthew C. Cassell and Rui Wang, District of Arizona, Tucson, handled the prosecution.

 

Man gets 3 years for dealing firearms without a license

Isaias Delgado, 37, of Tucson was recently sentenced by U.S. District Judge Jennifer G. Zipps to 36 months in prison for engaging in the business of dealing firearms without a license. 

Zipps also ordered Delgado to pay a forfeiture judgment of over $43,500 and imposed an additional $2,000 fine. Delgado was previously found guilty of engaging in a business of dealing firearms without a license following a jury trial on Aug. 12, 2021.

Between May 2018 and April 2019, Delgado purchased and resold at least 38 firearms, including several .50 caliber rifles, AK-47 style rifles, AR-15 style rifles, and belt-fed rifles. The evidence showed that Delgado spent over $80,000 on firearms during this time. He immediately sold the firearms after acquiring them and made a significant profit off each sale. Two of the firearms were recovered in Mexico shortly after Delgado purchased and then sold them. Delgado has never held a federal firearms license that would allow him to engage in the firearm dealing business.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives conducted the investigation in this case. Assistant U.S. Attorney Angela W. Woolridge, District of Arizona, Tucson, handled the prosecution.

 

Cocaine distributor sentenced to five years

Diego Armando Equihua-Sanchez, 31, of Tucson was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Scott H. Rash to 60 months in prison, followed by 60 months of supervised release. Equihua-Sanchez previously pleaded guilty to aiding and abetting possession with the intent to distribute cocaine.

Equihua-Sanchez actively worked with others to distribute bulk amounts of cocaine in and around Tucson and other parts of the United States. On Nov. 2, 2020, Equihua-Sanchez delivered approximately 1 kilogram of cocaine to help complete a transaction involving an out-of-state customer. 

The Drug Enforcement Administration in Sierra Vista conducted the investigation in this case. Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael R. Lizano, District of Arizona, Tucson, handled the prosecution.

 

Man sentenced for role in romance fraud scheme

Onovughe Ighorhiohwunu, 47, of Kennesaw, Georgia, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Scott H. Rash to 130 months in prison for conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Ighorhiohwunu was previously found guilty by a federal jury of conspiring to launder more than $1.3 million in proceeds obtained from victims of an internet romance fraud. As part of his sentence, Ighorhiohwunu was fined $25,000 and ordered to pay $1,342,150 in restitution.

Evidence at trial and sentencing established that, between July 2019 and May 2020, Ighorhiohwunu participated in a scheme where conspirators with connections to Nigeria used fictitious or assumed online identities to meet victims in the United States. Conspirators contacted victims through dating websites and games like Words with Friends and then pretended to strike up romantic relationships with them. After establishing relationships, conspirators asked the victims for money, often to help with a phony crisis such as an emergency medical procedure, and usually told the victims their money would be repaid. 

Conspirators directed at least 10 victims to send large sums of money by mail or wire to Ighorhiohwunu and others, which was then withdrawn in cash and hand-delivered to conspirators or wired to other bank accounts. Ighorhiohwunu received payment for his role in the scheme.

“Internet-based scams like this one starkly illustrate both the greed of the perpetrators and the generosity of the elderly victims,” U.S. Attorney Gary Restaino said.  

“Thanks to our partners at the Federal Bureau of Investigation for unraveling the complex scheme and providing a strong message of deterrence.”

The U.S. Attorney’s Office encourages the public to be wary of similar scams and to verify with law enforcement and family members before sending money after any online or phone solicitations. 

The Federal Bureau of Investigation conducted the investigation in this case. The Financial Crimes and Public Corruption Section of the United States Attorney’s Office, District of Arizona, Tucson, handled the prosecution.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.