This week in Arizona history - Tucson Local Media: Pima Pinal

This week in Arizona history

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Posted: Tuesday, September 23, 2008 11:00 pm

On Wednesday, Sept. 24, 1891, Dr. J.C. Handy, physician and former chancellor of the University of Arizona, was shot and fatally wounded by attorney Francis J. Heney during a quarrel at the corner of Pennington and Church streets in Tucson.

On this date in 1929, while the Sunshine Climate Club celebrated at a dinner in Tucson, record floods cut off all highways east and west of town.

Thursday, Sept. 25

On this date in 1868, Arizona became a separate Roman Catholic Diocese under Bishop Jean Baptiste Salpointe.

On this date in 1896, the Tucson School Board decided that it could not afford to open a high school for only six students.

On this date in 1929, 4.7 inches of rain washed out bridges throughout southern Arizona, closing roads, isolating towns and stranding motorists, including a school bus which was trapped by mud and deep water northeast of Tucson with 20 children aboard. The children stayed overnight at a nearby home.

Friday, Sept. 26

On this date in 1864, the First Territorial Legislature convened in Prescott, adopted a code of laws, created the four original counties of Pima, Mohave, Yavapai and Yuma and established a university and a Board of Regents.

On this date in 1876, Taza, the son of Apache chief Cochise, died in Washington D.C. of pneumonia while he was visiting the Capitol with a group of Apaches. He was buried in the congressional cemetery with the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and other noted dignitaries in attendance.

On this date in 1929, a Tucson resident who had demanded, unsuccessfully, that his next-door neighbor maintain absolute silence between the hours of 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. each day erected a wall 14-feet high and 8-inches thick, extending the full length of the property line from the sidewalk to the alley.

Saturday, Sept. 27

On this date in 1858, Rafael Luna petitioned Col. Benjamin Bonneville for a military escort for protection while passing through Navajo Country along Beale Road with a flock of more than 50,000 sheep — the first flock to be driven to California along this route.

On this date in 1910, the town of Naco was destroyed by a fire which originated in a stable on the American side of the line.

On this date in 1922, The Arizona Republic reported government big-game hunter Ramsey Patterson saying that a Grizzly bear and a mountain lion were traveling, hunting and denning together. Patterson tracked the animals and killed the lion.

© 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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