Barbara Marriott, the author of the book “Images of America: Oro Valley,” sits down with The Explorer and talks about her views of town’s past and future.

Q

 What do you think is the most significant aspect of Oro Valley’s history?

A

 The people. They are multi-talented, multi–dimensional, energetic and the heart of Oro Valley.

Q

 What part of Oro Valley’s history is most overlooked?

A

 I think the people that I call the settlers that were here during the Depression and how they kept the area going doing what they had to do, not only to earn a living for themselves, but to keep their homestead.

That’s spirit, that’s determination and that’s the kind of courage that’s very difficult to find today.

Q

 Seeing the changes in Oro Valley since its founding in 1974, where do you see the town in 2074?

A

I see it maintaining its community spirit and its neighborhood mindset. And it’s caring for the quality of life for its people, even in 2074.

I think it’s going to be one of the rare communities in the West that will be able to maintain that. Much of that is due to the fact it is limited in its expansion.

Q

 What part of Oro Valley’s history inspires you most?

A

I get excited about what happens between 1870 and 1930. The type of people that were here and what they did and their values and how they lived, to me is very important because it determined the base of the era.

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