Remembering Tucson’s veterans and pioneers scheduled for Nov. 9 - Tucson Local Media: News

Remembering Tucson’s veterans and pioneers scheduled for Nov. 9

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 3:10 pm

Standing in the middle of downtown Tucson, not far from the Pima County Courthouse, is the monument to the Mormon Battalion, remembering the first time the United States military came to the Old Pueblo in 1846. They were the only religious unit to serve in the American military and their trek of 2,000 miles was the longest continual march in U.S. history.

A number of the 500 men, women, and children were impressed with what they saw in Arizona. One of them, Erastus Bingham, returned with his family years later and settled in the area along the Rillito River, which was running in those days, near Ft. Lowell and Alvernon Roads.  In the early 1900’s, many of the Mormon pioneers that came to Tucson were refugees, chased out of Northern Mexico by Pancho Villa. The Binghams welcomed them, helped them start their own farms and join their community, which became known as Binghampton.

The event will include music throughout the day, culminating at 2 p.m. with the traditional Veterans Day weekend performance by the 4th Cavalry Regimental Band. The re-enactors of the original 1884 band will be followed by a presentation by Ted Vogt, Director of the State of Arizona Department of Veterans Services who will honor Tucson’s Veterans. The Festival will conclude with the striking of the colors, the old 38 star flag representing the number of states at the time the Fort Lowell was in service.

The activity is planned for Saturday, November 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Ft. Lowell Park at 2900 N. Craycroft Road. Individuals interested in volunteering or providing frontier demonstrations are encouraged to contact Randy Madsen at (858) 395-0552.

© 2016 Tucson Local Media. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Welcome to the discussion.

Clutch - X-Ray Visions

More Featured Videos

Featured Videos

Spacer4px

Online poll

The Marana capital improvements improvements are expected to take years to complete as Marana finds the best plan of action to complete the projects and fund the improvements. Do you think this is a good idea?

The town of Marana is looking at ways to do capital improvements to the oldest neighborhoods in Marana. Over the next few months the town will survey older neighborhoods and see what amenities they need and form a plan to make sure neighborhoods have paved roads, sidewalks, adequate drainage, lighting and even pocket parks. “We want to make sure that every neighborhood has a base standard for infrastructure,” said Marana Town Manager Gilbert Davidson. The improvements are expected to take years to complete as Marana finds the best plan of action to complete the projects and fund the improvements. Do you think this is a good idea?

Total Votes: 20

Loading…

How do you feel about a potential memorial art project to honor our community’s bravest men and women?

During the Jan. 20 town council meeting, a vote was unanimously passed to look into the feasibility of a “Memorial Public Art Project,” at the request of Oro Valley resident Dick Eggerding to potentially be placed somewhere in the town to honor military veterans and first responders. Though no concrete plans were then ready to act on, there was a show of overwhelming support for such project from residents and staff alike during the council meeting. In an effort to poll to community at-large, The Explorer would like to know how you feel about a potential memorial art project to honor our community’s bravest men and women.

Total Votes: 37

Loading…

Follow us on Facebook