The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today that in 2013, union members accounted for 5.0 percent of wage and salary workers in Arizona, compared with 5.1 percent in 2012. (See chart 1.)

Regional Commissioner Richard J. Holden noted that the union membership rate in 2013 marked the series low for the state. The series high of 8.8 percent was recorded in both in 2007 and 2008.

Nationally, union members accounted for 11.3 percent of employed wage and salary workers in 2013, the same as in 2012.

Since 1989, when comparable state data became available, Arizona union membership rates have been below the U.S. average.

Arizona had 122,000 wage and salary workers who were union members in 2013. Additionally, another 25,000 workers in the state were represented by a union on their main job or covered by an employee association or contract while not being union members themselves. (See table A.)

Nationwide, 14.5 million wage and salary workers were union members in 2013 and 1.5 million wage and salary workers were not affiliated with a union but had jobs covered by a union contract.

Arizona had 122,000 wage and salary workers who were union members in 2013. Additionally, another 25,000 workers in the state were represented by a union on their main job or covered by an employee association or contract while not being union members themselves. (See table A.) Nationwide, 14.5 million wage and salary workers were union members in 2013 and 1.5 million wage and salary workers were not affiliated with a union but had jobs covered by a union contract.

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