Shearer explores New Orleans flooding in new documentary - Tucson Local Media: El Sol

Shearer explores New Orleans flooding in new documentary

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Posted: Wednesday, June 29, 2011 3:00 am

Harry Shearer is one of America’s crown princes of comedy. The humorist and comic is best known for his appearances in such mockumentaries as “Spinal Tap” and voices in the award-winning TV show “The Simpsons.” In his first feature-length documentary, humorist and New Orleans resident Shearer presents the inside story of a disaster that he believes could have been prevented from the people who were there.

The film will have one showing only, on July 6 at 7:30 p.m., at The Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. Tickets are $9. It is part of the theater’s “One-Hit Wonders” series showcasing new documentaries.

For more information, visit www.thebiguneasy.com or call 795-0844.

“The Big Uneasy” follows three people – the leaders of two scientific investigation teams and one whistleblower – as they reveal their conclusions about why New Orleans flooded, and why similar events also could happen anywhere in America.

Shearer speaks to the investigators who poked through the muck as the water receded and a whistle-blower from the Army Corps of Engineers, revealing that some of the same flawed methods responsible for the levee failure during Katrina are being used to rebuild the system expected to protect the new New Orleans from future peril.

In short segments hosted by actor John Goodman, Shearer speaks candidly with local residents about life in New Orleans. Together, they explore some questions that Americans outside of the Gulf region have been pondering in the five years since Katrina, such as the reasons why people choose the live below sea level and the importance of rebuilding New Orleans.

“The Big Uneasy” marks the beginning of the end of five years of ignorance about what happened to one of our nation’s most treasured cities, and serves as a stark reminder that the same agency that failed to protect New Orleans still exists in other cities across America, according to a press release.

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1 comment:

  • SandySays posted at 6:38 am on Wed, Jun 29, 2011.

    SandySays Posts: 1

    We sincerely hope The Big Uneasy marks the beginning of the end of ignorance regarding the flooding. But after almost six years, there has been no investigation, ordered by Congress or the White House, of the levee protection failures that drowned metro New Orleans and killed over 2,000 people.

    Immediately after the terrorist attack on American soil, master-minded by Osama Bin Laden, the White House ordered a bipartisan national commission to investigate the disaster to make certain it never happens again. A similar thing happened after the BP oil spill and the Challenger explosion.


     

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