Pima Animal Care Center at the close of last fiscal year saw pet rescues increase 39 percent over the previous year.

In Fiscal Year 2012, which ended June 30, 4,065 pets were removed from Pima Animal Care Center by rescue groups, special needs adopters, and rehabilitation specialists. That was up from 2,925 in Fiscal Year 2011.

So far in Fiscal Year 2013 to date, the shelter is seeing a 14 percent increase in rescued animals over last year at this time.

Many rescue organizations focus on animals that develop kennel cough or other ailments that can afflict pets in shelters. Allowing animals to recover in homes in the community can often provide a faster journey to health in a less stressful environment, and also helps reduce the spread of illness among the rest of the animals in the shelter.

“Saving more lives really is a community effort and we can’t thank our rescue partners enough for the help they’re providing in meeting that goal,” said Pima Animal Care Center Manager Kim Janes. “Their dedication to helping animals find good lives with loving homes is really an inspiration to all of us.”

More than 55 rescue organizations assist Pima Animal Care with its mission. With the help of Arizona Bird Dog Rescue, for example, more than 41 German Shorthair Pointers, English Pointers and Weimaraners have been rescued from the shelter in recent years.

Gracita Maria came into Pima Animal Care Center as an exhausted German Shorthair Pointer who had been used as a puppy mill and was in very poor condition. Rescued from the shelter after contracting kennel cough,the little character has recovered and is a source of amusement and joy in her new family’s home.

If you’ve adopted a pet from a rescue group, the advocates there would probably love to see an updated picture of your pet, or an acknowledgement on their Facebook pages.

And as always, if you’re looking for a pet to warm up your home, Pima Animal Care Center has many great pets in all sizes, shapes and colors to choose from. Please connect with us at www.pima.gov/animalcare.

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